Moral Policing and Gender-based Violence: Portrayal of Honour and Shame in Poile Sengupta’s Mangalam

Authors

  • Bhawna Singh Department of English, Chaudhary Charan Singh University (Campus) Meerut, Uttar Pradesh-250004, India https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9709-6632
  • Ansa Hameed Department of English, College of Sciences and Humanities, Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz University, Abdullah Bin Amer, 16278, Alkharj, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
  • Sohaib Alam Department of English, College of Sciences and Humanities, Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz University, Abdullah Bin Amer, 16278, Alkharj, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9972-9357

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.15503/jecs2023.2.425.436

Keywords:

Violence, honour, shame, patriarchy, domestic sphere

Abstract

Thesis. The article aims to study Poile Sengupta’s play entitled Mangalam to analyse how the play raises a voice against society’s enforced models of masculinity and femininity, and sexual and psychological violence and its impact on women in the domestic sphere.

Concept. The study foregrounds the impact of moral policing via the notions of honour and shame in Sengupta’s Mangalam and analyses that family, a micro-unit of patriarchy is the primary location of violence inflicted on women. The present study further attempts to examine interpersonal violence perpetuated through the institution of marriage through a study of the portrayal of marital violence in Sengupta’s Mangalam.

Results and Conclusion. Sengupta presents contemporary social issues and interrogates moral policing and violence perpetuated by patriarchy through the discussed play. It presents a dramatic piece written by a woman, thus challenging the male-dominated narratives through a voice of protest and addressing violence inflicted on a woman’s body and psyche.

Originality. The originality of the study relies on examining the underlying causes of gender-based violence within the institution of marriage and family as the smallest unit of patriarchy while also understanding the relevance of literary representations by women dramatists as resistance literature.

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Author Biographies

  • Bhawna Singh, Department of English, Chaudhary Charan Singh University (Campus) Meerut, Uttar Pradesh-250004, India

    PhD (English), is an Assistant Professor at the Department of English, Chaudhary Charan Singh University (Campus), Meerut, India. She specialises in post-independence women's drama. Her research interests include contemporary Indian drama in English and Hindi, focusing on women's theatre in India. She has taught courses in literature and communication at Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi, P.G.D.A.V. College, University of Delhi, India, and Chhatrapati Shahu Ji Maharaj University (formerly Kanpur University), India. She has presented papers in various national and international conferences and has participated in seminars and workshops on contemporary theatre practices. She has published several papers as co-author and sole author in various indexed journals and conference proceedings.

    ngh, PhD (English), is an Assistant Professor at the Department of English, Chaudhary Charan Singh University (Campus), Meerut, India. She specialises in post-independence women's drama. Her research interests include contemporary Indian drama in English and Hindi, focusing on women's theatre in India. She has taught courses in literature and communication at Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi, P.G.D.A.V. College, University of Delhi, India, and Chhatrapati Shahu Ji Maharaj University (formerly Kanpur University), India. She has presented papers in various national and international conferences and has participated in seminars and workshops on contemporary theatre practices. She has published several papers as co-author and sole author in various indexed journals and conference proceedings.

  • Ansa Hameed, Department of English, College of Sciences and Humanities, Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz University, Abdullah Bin Amer, 16278, Alkharj, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    She is currently working as an Assistant Professor in the Department of English, at Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz University, College of Science and Humanities, Saudi Arabia. Her research interests include Ecolinguistics, Corpus Linguistics, discourse analysis and Applied Linguistics. 

  • Sohaib Alam, Department of English, College of Sciences and Humanities, Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz University, Abdullah Bin Amer, 16278, Alkharj, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    He is currently working as an Assistant Professor of English at the Department of English, College of Science and Humanities, Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia. He holds a Ph.D. in English Language Teaching (ELT) from Aligarh Muslim University, India. His areas of interest are Applied Linguistics, Pragmatics, Teaching Methods, Blended Learning, and Pedagogic Theory. He has presented papers at both national and international conferences, and published research articles and papers in Scopus & WoS indexed journals. He has been teaching English for over 4 years

     

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Published

2023-09-28

How to Cite

Singh, B., Hameed, A., & Alam, S. (2023). Moral Policing and Gender-based Violence: Portrayal of Honour and Shame in Poile Sengupta’s Mangalam. Journal of Education Culture and Society, 14(2), 425-436. https://doi.org/10.15503/jecs2023.2.425.436

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